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dc.contributor.authorChen, Yuezh_CN
dc.contributor.authorPan, Lilizh_CN
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Nizh_CN
dc.contributor.authorTroy, Frederic A.zh_CN
dc.contributor.authorWang, Bingzh_CN
dc.contributor.author王冰zh_CN
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-22T07:37:26Z
dc.date.available2015-07-22T07:37:26Z
dc.date.issued2014-01-28zh_CN
dc.identifier.citationBRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION, 2014,111(2):332-341zh_CN
dc.identifier.otherWOS:000332950700018zh_CN
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.xmu.edu.cn/handle/2288/93688
dc.descriptionSchool of Medicine, Xiamen Universityzh_CN
dc.description.abstractRed meat and dairy products contain high sialic acid (Sia) levels, but the metabolic fate and health impact in children remain unknown. The aims of the present study were to quantify the levels of urinary Sia N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) and ketodeoxynonulosonic acid (KDN) and to determine their relationship with dietary Sia intake. Spot urine samples were collected from 386 healthy children aged 3 (n 108), 4 (n 144) and 5 (n 134) years at 06.30-07.00, 11.30-12.00 and 16.30-17.00 hours. Food intake levels were recorded on the day of urine sample collection. Sia levels were quantified using LC-MS/MS with [C-13(3)]Sia as an internal standard. We found that (1) total urinary Sia levels in healthy pre-school children ranged from 40 to 79mmol Sia/mol creatinine; (2) urinary Sia levels were independent of age and consisted of conjugated Neu5Ac (approximately 70 center dot 8%), free Neu5Ac (approximately 21 center dot 3%), conjugated KDN (approximately 4 center dot 2%) and free KDN (approximately 3 center dot 7%); Neu5Gc was detected in the urine of only one 4-year-old girl; (3) total urinary Sia levels were highest in the morning and declined over time in 4- and 5-year-old children (P<0 center dot 05), but not in 3-year-old children; (4) Sia intake levels at breakfast and lunch were approximately 2 center dot 5 and 0 center dot 16mg Sia/kg body weight; and (5) there was no significant correlation between dietary Sia intake levels and urinary Sia levels. Urinary Sia levels varied with age and time of day, but did not correlate with Sia intake in 3- to 5-year-old children. The difference in urinary Sia levels in children of different age groups suggests that the metabolism and utilisation rates of dietary Sia are age dependent.zh_CN
dc.language.isoen_USzh_CN
dc.publisherCAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESSzh_CN
dc.source.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114513002468zh_CN
dc.subjectBRAIN-DEVELOPMENTzh_CN
dc.subjectESSENTIAL NUTRIENTzh_CN
dc.subjectSTORAGE DISEASEzh_CN
dc.subjectPOLYSIALIC ACIDzh_CN
dc.subjectNORMAL HUMANSzh_CN
dc.subjectCANCER-CELLSzh_CN
dc.subjectEXPRESSIONzh_CN
dc.subjectEXCRETIONzh_CN
dc.subjectSUPPLEMENTATIONzh_CN
dc.subjectGANGLIOSIDESzh_CN
dc.titleLC-MS/MS quantification of N-acetylneuraminic acid, N-glycolylneuraminic acid and ketodeoxynonulosonic acid levels in the urine and potential relationship with dietary sialic acid intake and disease in 3- to 5-year-old childrenzh_CN
dc.typeArticlezh_CN


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