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dc.contributor.authorHu, Haizh_CN
dc.contributor.authorMeijer, Onno G.zh_CN
dc.contributor.authorvan Dieen, Jaap H.zh_CN
dc.contributor.authorHodges, Paul W.zh_CN
dc.contributor.authorBruijn, Sjoerd M.zh_CN
dc.contributor.authorStrijers, Rob L.zh_CN
dc.contributor.authorNanayakkara, Prabath W. B.zh_CN
dc.contributor.authorvan Royen, Barend J.zh_CN
dc.contributor.authorWu, Wen Huazh_CN
dc.contributor.authorXia, Chunzh_CN
dc.contributor.author夏春zh_CN
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-22T07:36:44Z
dc.date.available2015-07-22T07:36:44Z
dc.date.issued2011-05zh_CN
dc.identifier.citationEUROPEAN SPINE JOURNAL, 2011,20(5):759-765zh_CN
dc.identifier.otherWOS:000290800300013zh_CN
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.xmu.edu.cn/handle/2288/93300
dc.descriptionStryker Howmedica Nederland, Biomet Nederland; Dutch Society of Exercise Therapists Cesar and Mensendieck (VvOCM)zh_CN
dc.description.abstractPsoas function is a topic of considerable relevance in sports and clinical science. However, the literature on psoas function is not sufficiently consistent. Questions are, amongst others, if during hip flexion the psoas always has the same function as the iliacus, and if the psoas affects the hip more than the lumbar spine. In the present study, 17 healthy women, 20-40 years, performed the active straight leg raise (ASLR), with the right or the left leg ("Side"), and without or with weight added above the ankle ("Condition"). Electromyographic (EMG) activity of psoas and iliacus were recorded with fine-wire electrodes, and of rectus femoris and adductor longus with surface electrodes, all on the right side. Movements of the leg were recorded with active markers and a camera system. During ASLR, the iliacus, rectus femoris, adductor longus and psoas were active ipsilaterally, but psoas was also active contralaterally. All muscles started to contract before movement onset, the iliacus, rectus femoris, and adductor longus largely at the same time, before the psoas. There was no significant difference between the amplitude or time of onset of ipsilateral and contralateral psoas EMG activity, nor was there a significant interaction between Side and Condition for the psoas. Although ipsilateral psoas activity is consistent with the psoas being a hip flexor, contralateral activity is not. The most simplest explanation of the pattern found is that the psoas is bilaterally recruited to stabilize the lumbar spine, probably in the frontal plane.zh_CN
dc.language.isoen_USzh_CN
dc.publisherEUR SPINE Jzh_CN
dc.source.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00586-010-1508-5zh_CN
dc.subjectLUMBAR SPINEzh_CN
dc.subjectMUSCLE-ACTIVITYzh_CN
dc.subjectMAJOR MUSCLEzh_CN
dc.subjectELECTROMYOGRAPHYzh_CN
dc.subjectSTABILITYzh_CN
dc.subjectEMGzh_CN
dc.subjectONSETzh_CN
dc.subjectFORCEzh_CN
dc.subjectASLRzh_CN
dc.titleIs the psoas a hip flexor in the active straight leg raise?zh_CN
dc.typeArticlezh_CN


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