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dc.contributor.authorFang, Taotaozh_CN
dc.contributor.authorBullock, Jameszh_CN
dc.contributor.authorBoylan-Kolchin, Michaelzh_CN
dc.contributor.author方陶陶zh_CN
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-22T07:23:41Z
dc.date.available2015-07-22T07:23:41Z
dc.date.issued2013-Jan 1zh_CN
dc.identifier.citationASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL, 2013,762(1)zh_CN
dc.identifier.otherWOS:000313007900020zh_CN
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.xmu.edu.cn/handle/2288/91831
dc.descriptionNational Natural Science Foundation of China [11243001, 11273021]; Southern California Center for Galaxy Evolution; University of California Office of Research; Miller Institute for Basic Research in Sciencezh_CN
dc.description.abstractThe Milky Way appears to be missing baryons, as the observed mass in stars and gas is well below the cosmic mean. One possibility is that a substantial fraction of the Galaxy's baryons are embedded within an extended, million-degree hot halo, an idea supported indirectly by observations of warm gas clouds in the halo and gas-free dwarf spheroidal satellites. X-ray observations have established that hot gas does exist in our Galaxy beyond the local hot bubble; however, it may be distributed in a hot disk configuration. Moreover, recent investigations into the X-ray constraints have suggested that any Galactic corona must be insignificant. Here we re-examine the observational data, particularly in the X-ray and radio bands, in order to determine whether it is possible for a substantial fraction of the Galaxy's baryons to exist in similar to 10(6) K gas. In agreement with past studies, we find that a baryonically closed halo is clearly ruled out if one assumes that the hot corona is distributed with a cuspy Navarro-Frenk-White profile. However, if the hot corona of the galaxy is in an extended, low-density distribution with a large central core, as expected for an adiabatic gas in hydrostatic equilibrium, then it may contain up to 10(11) M-circle dot of material, possibly accounting for all of the missing Galactic baryons. We briefly discuss some potential avenues for discriminating between a massive, extended hot halo and a local hot disk.zh_CN
dc.language.isoen_USzh_CN
dc.publisherIOP PUBLISHING LTDzh_CN
dc.source.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0004-637X/762/120zh_CN
dc.subjectHIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDSzh_CN
dc.subjectX-RAYzh_CN
dc.subjectGALAXY FORMATIONzh_CN
dc.subjectMAGELLANIC STREAMzh_CN
dc.subjectDARK-MATTERzh_CN
dc.subjectDWARF GALAXIESzh_CN
dc.subjectGALACTIC HALOzh_CN
dc.subjectLOCAL GROUPzh_CN
dc.subjectSIGHT LINEzh_CN
dc.subjectDISK GALAXIESzh_CN
dc.titleON THE HOT GAS CONTENT OF THE MILKY WAY HALOzh_CN
dc.typeArticlezh_CN


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