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dc.contributor.authorHsu, Shih-Chiehzh_CN
dc.contributor.authorLin, Fei-Janzh_CN
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Tsun-Hsienzh_CN
dc.contributor.authorLin, Shuen-Hsinzh_CN
dc.contributor.authorKao, Shuh-Jizh_CN
dc.contributor.authorTseng, Chun-Maozh_CN
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Chao-Haozh_CN
dc.contributor.author高树基zh_CN
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-22T03:12:16Z
dc.date.available2015-07-22T03:12:16Z
dc.date.issued2013zh_CN
dc.identifier.citationATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT, 2013,79:93-100zh_CN
dc.identifier.otherWOS:000325834700012zh_CN
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.xmu.edu.cn/handle/2288/87941
dc.descriptionNational Science Council (Taiwan) [NSC 98-2611-M-001-003, NSC 98-2621-M-002005, NSC 99-2611-M-001-005, NSC 99-2628-M-001-006, NSC 100-2628-M-001-008-MY4]; thematic program Atmospheric Forcing on Ocean Biogeochemistry (AFOBi); Drunken Moon Lake Scientific Integrated Scientific Research Platform" of Academia Sinicazh_CN
dc.description.abstractA six-step sequential extraction protocol was employed for marine aerosols with varying mixture of dust and pollution particles collected from the East China Sea to study the dissolution kinetics of refractory elements Fe, Al, and Ti (with a focus on Fe) in relation to acidic substances such as sulfate, nitrate, and water-soluble organic carbon. The three elements might be of a natural origin such as Asian dust and/or anthropogenic origins such as coal fly ash and biomass burning; however, this study focused on the dissolution kinetics, instead of their sources. We selected three samples with varying dust loading but close acid loadings for the experiment so that the acidic effect on the aerosol Fe dissolution could be explored as the direct contribution of water-soluble Fe from anthropogenic sources, if any, might be constrained at a relatively constant level among the samples. Extraction was stepwise performed with six steps for total 30 min, and the leaching duration was as short as ten seconds in the first five steps. No saturation was found for the analyzed elements. Two phases of dissolution curves were observed in all interested compositions, which could be explained by an aged aerosol particle model, with an intrinsically insoluble core and weathered surface. The first phase curve approximates the first-order reaction, with considerably high dissolution rates of 6.5-277 innol g(-1), min(-1), indicating the likely existence of an "extremely fast iron pool" that may exist on the weathered surface of aged particles, along with other three pools proposed by Shi et al. (2011). Acid/dust ratio could be a crucial factor that facilitates parameterization of aerosol iron dissolution. Results of this study are useful in improving aerosol iron and other transition element dissolution schemes in atmospheric chemistry models. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.zh_CN
dc.language.isoen_USzh_CN
dc.publisherPERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTDzh_CN
dc.source.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2013.06.037zh_CN
dc.subjectMINERAL DUSTzh_CN
dc.subjectIRON SOLUBILITYzh_CN
dc.subjectATMOSPHERIC IRONzh_CN
dc.subjectSAHARAN DUSTzh_CN
dc.subjectLOW PHzh_CN
dc.subjectOCEANzh_CN
dc.subjectMETALSzh_CN
dc.subjectVARIABILITYzh_CN
dc.subjectDEPOSITIONzh_CN
dc.subjectSPECIATIONzh_CN
dc.titleShort time dissolution kinetics of refractory elements Fe, Al, and Ti in Asian outflow-impacted marine aerosols and implicationszh_CN
dc.typeArticlezh_CN


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