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dc.contributor.authorYang Jian-Hui
dc.contributor.authorLiao Yu-Fang
dc.contributor.authorLin Wu-Bin
dc.contributor.authorWu Wen
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-10T02:09:31Z
dc.date.available2020-10-10T02:09:31Z
dc.date.issued2019-12-30
dc.identifier.citationBMC health services research,2019,(1)
dc.identifier.other10.1186/s12913-019-4843-1
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.xmu.edu.cn/handle/2288/174905
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND(#br)Prescribing errors may, influenced by some risk factors, cause adverse drug events. Most studies in this field focus on errors in prescriptions for hospital inpatients, with only a few on those for outpatients. Our study aimed to explore the incidence of prescribing errors in electronic prescriptions and illustrate the trend of prescribing workload and error rate over time.(#br)METHODS(#br)The cross-section study was performed between September, 2015 and November, 2015. Prescribing errors were intercepted by pharmacists using a prescription reviewing system under which prescriptions with errors were transferred to a specific computer and recorded by another pharmacist and the incidence of total prescribing errors and severe errors was then calculated. A subgroup analysis was conducted in accordance to the number of drug orders, the age group of patients, the seniority of physicians, the specialty of physicians, the working day when prescriptions were issued, and the prescribing workload of physicians. A time-series analysis was employed to analyze the trend of prescribing workload and error rate, and the correlation between them.(#br)RESULTS(#br)Totally, 65,407 patients were included in this study and 150,611 prescriptions with 294,564 drug orders (including 584 different drugs) were reviewed for identification of errors. A total of 534 prescribing errors (an error rate of 0.34%) were identified. Severe errors accounted for 13.62% of total errors. The subgroup analysis showed prescriptions of multiple drug orders, for pediatric patients aged 29 days to 12 years, from physicians specializing in ophthalmology and otorhinolaryngology, or prescribing on weekdays were more susceptible to errors. A time-series analysis demonstrated no correlation between prescribing workload and error rate which increased at the end of each working shift while prescribing workload decreased.(#br)CONCLUSION(#br)Less than 1% of the studied prescriptions came with errors among which one in seven were severe ones. But prescribing errors were in no relation to workloads. What’s more, further studies are needed to investigate pharmacist-led intervention to reduce prescribing errors.
dc.language.isozh_CN
dc.subjectChina
dc.subjectOutpatients
dc.subjectPharmacist-led intervention
dc.subjectPrescribing errors
dc.subjectPrescribing workloads
dc.subjectSubgroup analysis
dc.subjectTime-series analysis
dc.titlePrescribing errors in electronic prescriptions for outpatients intercepted by pharmacists and the impact of prescribing workload on error rate in a Chinese tertiary-care women and children's hospital.
dc.typeArticle


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