Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLin, Tao
dc.contributor.author吝涛
dc.contributor.authorCoppack, Timothy
dc.contributor.authorLin, Qing-xian
dc.contributor.authorKulemeyer, Christoph
dc.contributor.authorSchmidt, Andreas
dc.contributor.authorBehm, Holger
dc.contributor.authorLuo, Tao
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-18T08:22:07Z
dc.date.available2013-04-18T08:22:07Z
dc.date.issued2012-04
dc.identifier.citationECOLOGICAL INDICATORS,2012,15(1):30-35zh_CN
dc.identifier.issn1470-160X
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolind.2011.09.018
dc.identifier.uriWOS:000298129100004
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.xmu.edu.cn/handle/2288/15980
dc.description.abstractUrbanization is dramatically altering biodiversity and ecosystem health worldwide. Birds are highly reactive to environmental change and are thus important indicators of ecological condition at both a global and a local scale. Flight initiation distance (FID) is generally used as a quantitative measure of a bird's tolerance to human-caused disturbance and may indicate how well a species or population has become adapted to chronic environmental stress. Here, we address the following questions, looking at species-specific FID values in different habitats along the urban-rural gradient: (a) Are within-species FID values generally lower in strongly urbanized areas than in more rural areas? And if so, (b) does variation of FID (VFID) indicate species-specific tolerance to urbanization? From 2008 to 2009, we measured FID in coastal bird species at eight sites along the urbanized coast of Xiamen, China, in a total of 254 trials. The results indicate that bird species with a high propensity to disperse and with large population sizes tend to decrease their FID more strongly along the urban-rural habitat gradient. This pattern was most apparent in the Little Egret (Egretta garzetta). Based on VFID, 17 bird species out of 36 were classified as being tolerant to urban environmental conditions, with FID values showing decreasing trends along the urban-rural gradient, as in the Little Egret. Our results suggest that VFID may be the relevant measure for analyzing birds' tolerance to urbanization and for assessing the speed by which species or populations can adjust or adapt to novel environmental conditions. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.zh_CN
dc.description.sponsorshipChina Postdoctoral Science Foundation; Fujian Provincial department of Science and Technology; Xiamen Municipal Bureau of Science and Technology; Chinese Academy of Sciences [20110490614, 201010014, 3502Z20111049, KZCX2-YW-450, KLUEH201007]zh_CN
dc.language.isoenzh_CN
dc.publisherELSEVIER SCIENCE BVzh_CN
dc.subjectFlight initiation distancezh_CN
dc.subjectIndicatorzh_CN
dc.subjectBird tolerancezh_CN
dc.subjectAdaptationzh_CN
dc.subjectUrban environmentzh_CN
dc.titleDoes avian flight initiation distance indicate tolerance towards urban disturbance?zh_CN
dc.typeArticlezh_CN


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record