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dc.contributor.authorChen, Nengwang
dc.contributor.author陈能汪
dc.contributor.authorHong, Huasheng
dc.contributor.author洪华生
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-03T10:19:49Z
dc.date.available2013-04-03T10:19:49Z
dc.date.issued2012-05
dc.identifier.citationCURRENT OPINION IN ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY,2012,4(2):233-242zh_CN
dc.identifier.issn1877-3435
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cosust.2012.03.007
dc.identifier.uriWOS:000304734500011
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.xmu.edu.cn/handle/2288/15493
dc.description.abstractThis paper is a brief review on nutrient variation (changes in element concentrations and ratios) and the associated aquatic ecosystem responses in the subtropical region. Human activities have significantly modified both the flux and the ratio of nutrients delivered to aquatic ecosystems. Climate perturbations influence the hydrological regime and enhance nutrient mineralization and transport from land to receiving waters. Changes in land use and damming have resulted in changes in the balance among nitrogen, phosphorus and silicon elements, thus increasing the risk of algal bloom. Nutrient variation and its ecological effects in the subtropical region could be more significant than in other areas because of rapid development and high population. Aquatic ecosystems respond to nutrient variation in complex and dynamic ways resulting in eutrophication, hypoxia/anoxia, acidification, and changes in phytoplankton and microbial communities. This review suggests that harmful algal bloom, jellyfish bloom, and serious pathogens are often associated with nutrient variations. The current challenges to scientific research and management include the facts that (1) the link between nutrient dynamics and ecosystem responses is poorly understood; (2) monitoring data to support modeling and management are scarce; (3) aquatic ecosystems are site-specific and/or situation-specific and are highly dynamic, giving greater complexity in research and management; and (4) the lack of regional coordination in traditional management causes transboundary gaps. To address these current challenges, an integrated management framework was proposed for effective nutrient management. Institutional arrangements should be developed to coordinate across multiple government agencies and other stakeholders from watershed to coast. The framework should integrate an interdisciplinary scientific approach and adaptive principles regarding nutrient management.zh_CN
dc.language.isoenzh_CN
dc.publisherELSEVIER SCI LTDzh_CN
dc.subjectEAST CHINA SEAzh_CN
dc.subject3 GORGES DAMzh_CN
dc.subjectPEARL RIVERzh_CN
dc.subjectFRESH-WATERzh_CN
dc.subjectLAND-USEzh_CN
dc.subjectPHYTOPLANKTON GROWTHzh_CN
dc.subjectMARINE ECOSYSTEMSzh_CN
dc.subjectJELLYFISH BLOOMSzh_CN
dc.subjectYANGTZE-RIVERzh_CN
dc.subjectBALTIC SEAzh_CN
dc.titleIntegrated management of nutrients from the watershed to coast in the subtropical regionzh_CN
dc.typeArticlezh_CN


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