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dc.contributor.authorGao, Kunshan
dc.contributor.author高昆山
dc.contributor.authorXu, Juntian
dc.contributor.authorGao, Guang
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yahe
dc.contributor.authorHutchins, David A.
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Bangqin
dc.contributor.authorWang, Lei
dc.contributor.authorZheng, Ying
dc.contributor.authorJin, Peng
dc.contributor.authorCai, Xiaoni
dc.contributor.authorHaeder, Donat-Peter
dc.contributor.authorLi, Wei
dc.contributor.authorXu, Kai
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Nana
dc.contributor.authorRiebesell, Ulf
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-15T01:38:19Z
dc.date.available2013-03-15T01:38:19Z
dc.date.issued2012-07
dc.identifier.citationNATURE CLIMATE CHANGE,2012,2(7):519-523zh_CN
dc.identifier.issn1758-678X
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/NCLIMATE1507
dc.identifier.uriWOS:000306249500016
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.xmu.edu.cn/handle/2288/15138
dc.description.abstractCarbon dioxide and light are two major prerequisites of photosynthesis. Rising CO2 levels in oceanic surface waters in combination with ample light supply are therefore often considered stimulatory to marine primary production(1-3). Here we show that the combination of an increase in both CO2 and light exposure negatively impacts photosynthesis and growth of marine primary producers. When exposed to CO2 concentrations projected for the end of this century(4), natural phytoplankton assemblages of the South China Sea responded with decreased primary production and increased light stress at light intensities representative of the upper surface layer. The phytoplankton community shifted away from diatoms, the dominant phytoplankton group during our field campaigns. To examine the underlying mechanisms of the observed responses, we grew diatoms at different CO2 concentrations and under varying levels (5-100%) of solar radiation experienced by the phytoplankton at different depths of the euphotic zone. Above 22-36% of incident surface irradiance, growth rates in the high-CO2-grown cells were inversely related to light levels and exhibited reduced thresholds at which light becomes inhibitory. Future shoaling of upper-mixed-layer depths will expose phytoplankton to increased mean light intensities(5). In combination with rising CO2 levels, this may cause a widespread decline in marine primary production and a community shift away from diatoms, the main algal group that supports higher trophic levels and carbon export in the ocean.zh_CN
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Basic Research Program of China [2009CB421207, 2011CB200902]; National Natural Science Foundation of China [41120164007, 40930846]; Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team project [IRT0941]; Ministry of Science and Technology [S2012GR0290]; United States National Science Foundation Division of Ocean Sciences [0942379, 0962309, 1043748]; German Ministry of Education and Research; 111 project; State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science (Xiamen University); German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD)zh_CN
dc.language.isoenzh_CN
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUPzh_CN
dc.subjectSOLAR UV-RADIATIONzh_CN
dc.subjectOCEAN ACIDIFICATIONzh_CN
dc.subjectCARBON ACQUISITIONzh_CN
dc.subjectANTHROPOGENIC CO2zh_CN
dc.subjectATMOSPHERIC CO2zh_CN
dc.subjectPHYTOPLANKTONzh_CN
dc.subjectDIATOMSzh_CN
dc.subjectPHOTOSYNTHESISzh_CN
dc.subjectCALCIFICATIONzh_CN
dc.subjectFIXATIONzh_CN
dc.titleRising CO2 and increased light exposure synergistically reduce marine primary productivityzh_CN
dc.typeArticlezh_CN


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